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The new standard
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 by Mike Burrows

Kanban from the Inside
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Using Kanban Now?

How to do Planning and Reporting

 

Project
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Posted on October 30, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban Coaching Masterclasses in 2015

We've listed only 1 public Kanban Coaching Masterclass for 2015 in San Diego in January on the week of the 19th. So far we have 11 out of 12 places subscribed and one client expects to fill that final place. We will be listing a 2nd spillover class also in January for the week of 12th January. This should be posted by end of next week. If you are interested in attending a 2015 masterclass please follow the sales link at the bottom of this page. We do not plan to list any more public masterclasses in 2015.

Posted on October 28, 2014 by David Anderson

The Tyranny of the Ever Decreasing Timebox

Agile software development methods, with the exception of Feature-Driven Development, adopt the use of fixed time increments, often wrongly called “iterations”. In Scrum, these are known as Sprints. A Sprint is a fixed period of time with a defined scope and a commitment to complete that scope within that time window. Originally, Scrum defined 4 week sprints. This was changed later, circa 2004, to a recommendation for 2 weeks to be the default length for a sprint. In general it is recognized that agility is related to the frequency of interaction with the customers or business owners, and the frequency of deliveries. Hence, smaller timeboxes are more desirable. Software quality is often related to batch size and time to complete work in a non-linear fashion, hence, smaller batches, completed in short periods of time leads to dramatically fewer defects.

As a result of all these advantages, organizations adopting Agile software development methods, have been under pressure to adopt the use of shorter and shorter timeboxes for their sprints or iterations. On the face of it, smaller timeboxes and hence smaller batch sizes for the sprint backlog, are a good thing. However, smaller timeboxes create two types of pressure that are often difficult to cope with and adjust to: firstly, smaller batches require an ever more detailed approach to requirements analysis and development – the need to write every more fine-grained stories which can be completed within the smaller time window; and the need for an ever more accurate approach to estimation, so that a realistic commitment can made.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban Litmus Test - Revisited

The Kanban Litmus Test is our new guidance to help you assess "are we doing Kanban or not?" and to evaluate whether other who claim to be doing have actually reached a stage that would reflect the sort of impact that we saw in early implementations almost a decade ago.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Enterprise Kanban: Where to Start?

For a corporation setting out on a large scale Kanban implementation, there is the inevitable question of, where to start? Typically, clients want to run a pilot on a single service delivery workflow but which one to choose? Firstly, we must find a service delivery workflow that is appropriate for a kanban system. [See the first post in this series on appropriateness of kanban systems]. To do this, we might view the organization through The Kanban Lens in order to identify suitable services. Secondly, we must assess whether this service is a good choice for a place to start Kanban.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban: When is it appropriate? (part 1)

In the Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass, I teach coaches and those leading Kanban initiatives how to assess the appropriateness of the Kanban Method and the appropriateness of applying a kanban system within an organization. This is the first of a series of blog posts on appropriateness and getting started with an enterprise scale Kanban initiative.